Best plastic-free books to help you lead a greener life



Although 2020 undoubtedly brought its own set of challenges , for many, the enforced pause gave us time to reflect on what we as individuals can do to help the planet heal.


The disturbing stat that there will be more plastic in the sea by 2050 than fish was doing the rounds. While that is almost unfathomable, thankfully there is plenty we can do to ensure this doesn’t come to fruition.


With that in mind, rounded up a selection of books which aim to educate and inspire plastic-free living in all areas of our lives.


By demystifying eco-terms and offering real-life solutions, hope you’ll feel better armed with the tools you need, to be the change you want to see. Read on for a selection of the best books to live you best plastic-free life.


‘How to Save the World For Free’, Natalie Fee, published by Laurence King Publishing


Even for the most ardent environmentalist, saving the world can feel pretty daunting. In this book, Natalie Fee breaks down her suggestions for positive change, into more manageable chunks. Relating to all areas of your life, she explains how the small actions you make while getting dressed, exercising, or even having sex, can help to save the world. Whether that’s ditching the single-use plastic bottles or switching to a menstrual cup, all of the suggestions are completely free, or if they require a small initial outlay (like buying a reusable razor for example), they should save you money in the long run.



‘Waste Not Everyday: 365 ways to reduce, reuse and reconnect’, Erin Rhoads, published by Hardie Grant Books


Although this was written for an Australian audience, much of the advice can be applied here in the UK. The 365 bitesize snippets are easy to digest and take on board, and are helpfully divided into sections such as food, gifting and cleaning so you can dip in and out. Although Erin advocates recycling, she stresses that this should be the very last stage, instead urging us to repair, reduce and rethink before using a product in the first place, with suggestions including making your own Christmas crackers out of loo roll and buying second-hand gifts.