Forum Posts

hremon716
Feb 27, 2022
In General Discussion
All of the above (and so many other factors that no one knows about) play into your deliverability rate, or inbox placement rate. Deliverability rate is the number of your emails that arrive in the inbox compared to the junk or spam folder. The difference between deliverability and delivery is that an email is considered delivered even if it is in spam, i.e. received by inbox providers, whereas deliverability looks specifically at where your email was delivered. Here's how to measure deliverability: Deliverability rate = (number of non-spam emails delivered / number of emails delivered) x 100 If your inbox placement rate is low (less than 80%), it could be a sign that you're not sending the right content to the right audience at the right time. No, we are not talking about spam trigger words. It's much more complicated than that. The key is to make sure you have a good list, authenticate your emails, and send relevant content. Conversion rate (CVR) Email conversion rate measures how many people took the action you wanted them to take from your email. A conversion depends Image Masking Service on the purpose of your email and can range from a purchase or donation to signing up for a webinar or downloading an ebook. Here is how it is calculated: Conversion rate = (number of conversions / number of emails delivered) x 100 Personally, I like looking at conversion rate based on email clicks to see direct attribution, but looking at it from the number of emails sent gives you an idea of ​​indirect attribution . Just because someone didn't click on your email doesn't mean they didn't convert because of it. Revenue by email (RPE) Revenue per email (RPE) gives direct monetary value to your email sends. Here's how to get the number: Revenue per email = revenue generated / number of emails delivered If you calculate this for different types of emails, you can reliably forecast email revenue by planning for the coming months. What if the RPE is below your average? It could mean that your content, product, or service isn't hitting the right note with your audience. Revenue per subscriber (RPS) Revenue per subscriber (RPS) is a little different from RPE in that you're looking at the value of an email subscriber, not an email send. This distinction is important to include all your active subscribers, even those you don't always send to (and you shouldn't send everything to everyone anyway). How do you calculate RPS? Revenue per subscriber = revenue generated / number of active subscribers Be sure to look at a specific time, like last month or last year. Subscriber Lifetime Value (LTV) Subscriber Lifetime Value (LTV) measures the lifetime value a subscriber brings to your list. Truth be told, this one is trickier to calculate because you'll need the right data:
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hremon716
Feb 27, 2022
In General Discussion
Before we go through the code, let's see which clients will show the background CSS styling and which need the help of a VML fallback. The good news: background CSS support has improved, with webmail clients now fully supporting this method, meaning the background HTML attribute is no longer required . The bad news: Unfortunately, Windows 10 Mail just doesn't like background images. It will not deprecate the inline CSS or HTML background attribute. And applying VML will cause rendering issues with an "image cannot be displayed" error message. If you're concerned about the experience for Windows 10 Mail subscribers, What email clients do your subscribers use? Take a look at your own email client market share with Litmus Email Analytics. Find out which email clients you need to optimize your background images for. (Tip: If Windows 10 Mail is weak, don't worry.) Read more → Now that we've got that sorted, let's talk code! One of the fun things about Image Masking Service adding background images to your emails is that there are different ways you can do this. You can fill a small section or cover the body of your email, use a single image or a repeating pattern, and you can change your background images depending on whether your reader is on desktop, mobile, light mode , dark mode or even when they hover or hover over your image. Each technique requires a different approach, so let's take a look at the best ways to code them. Fixed or fixed width background image fixed width background When applying background images, it's always best to add your code to the containing table cell. Application to any other HTML element such as <table> or is unlikely to be supported by some email clients. This is what it should look like: Here, the image is scaled to the width and height of the cell by including background-size:cover in the inline CSS styles, and then positioned in the center. Adding these styles allows you to use a 2x image, which means you'll see a crisp render on Retina displays,
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hremon716
Feb 27, 2022
In General Discussion
Emails can seem a bit predictable with an image here, a block of text there… Any way to liven up the subscriber experience? Background pictures. They are unexpected and add another dimension to your design, making your emails “popular”. When done right, they make your email feel like a million bucks, but are incredibly easy to pull off. Keep reading for: The Benefits of Background Images Examples of inspirational emails Design Considerations How to code background images What are background images? (And what is this for ?) Background images are images applied to the background or behind an element. Instead of being a focal point of the email, like a hero image, they are more often subtle and complementary to other campaign content. The main advantage of using background images is that they allow you to place additional HTML content on top of them. Unlike other images, where only the image itself can exist in this space, background images provide layering possibilities, so you can have images, text or calls to action (CTA) additional in this same space. example of Image Masking Service live html text and bulletproof button on background image Using live HTML text over a background image, instead of including that text in the image, means your message is readable when images are turned off, making it a great technique for creating better and more accessible HTML emails. In addition to helping create campaigns that provide a better reading experience, background images also provide a wealth of design possibilities, setting your campaign apart from the competition. Creative Ways Brands Use Background Images Miro placed a background image containing shapes behind their hero section, drawing attention to the email's main title and messaging, which are layered using live text. Miro email with background image Source: very good emails Uplers used a background image to highlight a discount on their services, with a coupon image placed behind a coupon code. Uplers email background image for coupon code Source: very good emails Figma added a subtle repeating background pattern to the body of this email, introducing us to its new whiteboard product. The pattern they feature echoes the background found in the product.
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